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Category Archive: Books

If you want your children to be intelligent

If you want your children to be intelligent

Noteworthy, If you want your children to be intelligent – read them fairy-tales

If you want your children to be intelligent
According to Albert Einstein, If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales
Do you think fairy tales are only for girls? No, they aren’t. Here’s a hint – ask yourself who wrote them. I assure you, it wasn’t just the women. It’s the great male fantasy – all it takes is one dance to know that she’s the one. All it takes is the sound of her song from the tower, or a look at her sleeping face. And right away you know – this is the girl in your head, sleeping or dancing or singing in front of you. Yes, girls want their princes, but boys want their princesses just as much. And they don’t want a very long courtships. They want to know immediately. David Levithan
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Den lille Idas Blomster

Jade flowers. Den lille Idas Blomster

Ida’s Flowers by Russian doll maker Alexandra Okatova. Den lille Idas Blomster

Den lille Idas Blomster
Beautiful jade flowers featured in this post – made in Guangong, China. Chinese call it oil jade due to its shining, glossy texture and glass-like transparency, and the leaves are from green Taiwan Jadein. Meanwhile, these jade flowers in my post perfectly decorate the fairy tale written in 1835 by famous Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen (1805–1875). In particular, Den lille Idas Blomster or Little Ida’s Flowers.
‘My poor flowers are quite dead!’ said little Ida. ‘They were so pretty yesterday evening, and now all the leaves hang withered. Why do they do that?’ she asked the student, who sat on the sofa; for she liked him very much. He knew the prettiest stories, and could cut out the most amusing pictures—hearts, with little ladies in them who danced, flowers, and great castles in which one could open the doors: he was a merry student. ‘Why do the flowers look so faded to-day?’ she asked again, and showed him a whole bouquet, which was quite withered.
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History through LIFE magazine covers

History through LIFE magazine covers

History through LIFE magazine covers

History through LIFE magazine covers
When the first issue of Life magazine appeared on the newsstands, the U.S. was in the midst of the Great Depression and the world was headed toward war. Each week during World War II the magazine brought the war home to Americans; it had photographers in all theaters of war, from the Pacific to Europe. The magazine was so iconic that it was imitated in enemy propaganda using contrasting images of Life and Death. In the 1960s the magazine was filled with color photos of movie stars, President John F. Kennedy and his family, the war in Vietnam, and the Apollo program. Typical of the magazine’s editorial focus was a long 1964 feature on actress Elizabeth Taylor and her relationship to actor Richard Burton. Reporter Richard Meryman Jr. traveled with Taylor to New York, California, and Paris. Life ran a 6,000-word first-person article on the screen star.
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Su Blackwell paper worlds

Su Blackwell paper worlds

Fabulous forest fairy. Su Blackwell paper worlds

Su Blackwell paper worlds
Born in Sheffield in 1975, Su Blackwell is a talented English paper artist.
As a child she often spent her time playing in the woods near her home, in her own make-believe world. The girl believed that trees would protect her, and she gave names to them.
Su Blackwell creates paper fairytale world, where princesses live in paper kingdoms that emerge from the seven classic tales. Each one is illustrated by a series of intricate paper sculptures, meticulously cut from the pages of another edition of the same story.
Su graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2003. She makes intricate art works from every-day objects, transforming clothes and books into fantastical 3D forms. According to Su Blackwell, she creates her paper worlds with a help of scalpel, scissors, paper and glue. Her beautiful paper works exposed in private collections, art galleries and museums.
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Art of papercut and book carving

Art of papercut and book carving

The example of exquisite and beautiful Art of papercut and book carving

Art of papercut and book carving
There are some interesting facts about the art of carved book, which you probably didn’t know. First of all, the artfully carved book has a name – altered book. It is a form of mixed media artwork that changes a book from its original form into a different form, altering its appearance and meaning. Talented artists use old or new, recycled or multiple books, then cut, tear, glue, burn, fold, paint, rebind, gold-leaf, creating incredible art, sometimes even masterpieces. Altered books – shown and sold in art galleries and on the Internet. For example, an exhibition of altered books by contemporary artists, shown at the Bellevue Arts Museum in 2009, titled The Book Borrowers. In particular, it contained 31 works, books transformed into sculptural works. Also, The John Michael Kohler Arts Center hosted an exhibition of altered books in early 2010.
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Russian poetry – Marina Tsvetaeva and Anna Akhmatova

Russian poetry - Marina Tsvetaeva and Anna Akhmatova

Soviet poet Marina Tsvetaev. Russian poetry – Marina Tsvetaeva and Anna Akhmatovaa

Russian poetry – Marina Tsvetaeva and Anna Akhmatova
Most people interested in Russian literature and the culture of the twentieth century are familiar with the names Anna Akhmatova and Marina Tsvetaeva. However, few of them read any of their literary works. Considered two of the most talented writers of the century, they both experienced much suffering as artists and individuals in this tumultuous century.
Born on 8 October 1892, Soviet poet Marina Tsvetaeva lived through and wrote of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the Moscow famine that followed it. Sadly, in an attempt to save her daughter Irina from starvation, she placed her in a state orphanage in 1919, where she died of hunger. Tsvetaeva left Russia in 1922 and lived with her family in increasing poverty in Paris, Berlin and Prague before returning to Moscow in 1939. Her husband Sergei Efron and her daughter Ariadna Efron (Alya) got arrested on espionage charges in 1941; and her husband – executed. And Tsvetaeva herself committed suicide in 1941. As a lyrical poet, her passion and daring linguistic experimentation mark her as a striking chronicler of her times and the depths of the human condition.
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