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Category Archive: History

Invention of Sewing Machine

Invention of Sewing Machine

Invention of Sewing Machine

Invention of Sewing Machine
Interestingly, Leonardo da Vinci himself drew the first sketch of the Sewing Machine in the 15th century. However, only in 1755 German Karl Veyzental received a patent for a sewing machine, copying the formation of stitches by hand. Meanwhile, in 1790 the Englishman Thomas Saint invented the sewing machine for sewing boots. The machine had a manual transmission, billet boots moved relative to the needle arm. Improved machine-ply weave of the chain was founded by Frenchman B. Timoney.
The inventor of the sewing machine lockstitch was the American Elias Howe, he created it in 1845. The machine had a number of shortcomings, but it was more suitable for sewing than the previous machine inventors’.
The question “Who invented the sewing machine?” – The majority, do not hesitate to answer – Singer. Indeed, Singer machine is still regularly found in many families. And some may recall that Singer was granted a patent for its invention, from the entire set of details and one device: a needle with an eye at the bottom.

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Russian beauties made the profession of models prestigious

Russian beauties made the profession of models prestigious. Actress Anna Sten, Hollywood, 1932

Actress Anna Sten, Hollywood, 1932. Russian beauties made the profession of models prestigious

Russian beauties made the profession of models prestigious
The first half of the XX century was the anthem of beauty and taste of a Russian woman. Sung by poets of the Silver Age, educated in the Institute for Noble Maidens of St. Petersburg and Moscow, she had good manners and ability to speak foreign languages. Often the bearers of an aristocratic title – Russian women of the time were a real inspiration and muses. It is no accident that such geniuses of the XX century as Picasso, Dali, Matisse, Leger, Roland chose Russian women.
Russian beauty at the time was forced to choose the path most often outcast, so as not to be destroyed along with the entire family by Bolsheviks. About ten of millions of Russians of all classes left this country after 1917, in order to survive. Many of them arrived in France. The beautiful Russian women – wives, daughters and sisters of those who managed to get a visa.
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Diaghilevs Russian Seasons

Diaghilevs Russian Seasons

“L’Oiseau de feu” (Firebird, 1910). Russian prima ballerina Tamara Karsavina and Vaslav Nijinsky in Diaghilevs Russian Seasons

Diaghilevs Russian Seasons was a brilliant creation of the great Russian impresario and a patriot of our country Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (1872 – 1929). Extraordinary personality, the owner of the unique talents and gifts to open to surprise the world novelty, Diaghilev brought into the world of art new names of prominent choreographers. Among them – Fokine, Massine, Nijinska, Balanchine, the dancers and the dancers – Nijinsky, Viltzaka, Wojciechowski, Dolin, Lifar, Pavlova, Karsavina, Rubinstein, Spesivtseva, Nemchinova, and Danilova.
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Photographs of Iran – when skirts were short, dances energetic

Photographs of Iran - when skirts were short, dances energetic

Beautiful student girls. Photographs of Iran 1960-70s – when skirts were short, dances energetic

Photographs of Iran – when skirts were short, dances energetic
Made at a time when skirts were short, and dances energetic, and when the U.S. was not an enemy number one. Meanwhile, when the people of the West today hear the word “Iran”, they imagine another picture. In particular, veiled women, burning American flags and angry crowd shouting nationalist slogans. However, those who keep the memories of Tehran of 1960-70s, paint a completely different picture. In fact, before the Islamic revolution in 1979 the capital of Iran was one of the most culturally advanced in the world.
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Praskovia Zhemchugova serf actress of Count Sheremetyev

Praskovia Zhemchugova serf actress

Beautiful actress in a scenic costume playing Eliana, in Les mariages samnites by Andre Ernest Modeste Gretry. Praskovia Zhemchugova serf actress of Count Sheremetyev

Praskovia Zhemchugova serf actress of Count Sheremetyev
Born on July 20, 1768 into the family of a serf smith Ivan Kovalyov, Praskovia Kovaleva-Zhemchugova was a famous Russian serf actress and soprano opera singer. Praskovia and her family belonged to the Sheremetevs, one of the richest noble families in Russia at the time. In fact, her education and manners didn’t differ from most notable Russian ladies’. In particular, she was able to read and write music, played the harp, spoke French and Italian fluently. Undoubtedly, Praskovia could easily be a good match for any nobleman, if only not the lifelong stigma of a slave. Meanwhile, watching the development of theatrical career of his beautiful actress, strongly supporting and helping her, the Earl did not notice how he fell in love with her. And, according to all the laws of the time, their marriage was impossible. However, Nikolai Sheremetyev didn’t obey the rules of that time. He loved Praskovia, cared about her, and was her guardian angel.
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Crime being married to each other

Crime being married to each other. Mildred and Richard Loving

Crime being married to each other – Mildred and Richard Loving

Crime being married to each other

Without any doubts, this love story is weird. Mildred and Richard Lovings (family name Lovings speaks much, by the way) were arrested in 1958 for the crime, however crazy it sounds now, “being married to each other”. Thus, the sheriff of Caroline County, Virginia, arrested the couple in a nighttime raid in their bedroom.
Richard was a bricklayer with a blond buzz cut. Mildred was of Native American and African-American descent. A judge told the couple of Lovigns to leave their state for 25 years. The Court struck down miscegenation laws in many states. But the only message Richard had for the Supreme Court was: “Tell the court I love my wife.”
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Twelve fans of Elizabeth I Tudor

Twelve fans of Elizabeth, about 1585-'90. Twelve fans of Elizabeth I Tudor. Attributed to John Bettes the Elder. Collection of Fitzroy

Portrait of Elizabeth I, about 1585-’90. Attributed to an English artist John Bettes the Younger. Collection of Henry Fitzroy. Twelve fans of Elizabeth I Tudor

Twelve fans of Elizabeth
In the 17th century the folding fan, introduced from East Asia, became popular in Europe. In particular, these fans we see in the portraits of the high-born women of the era. And Queen Elizabeth 1st of England used both – folding fans decorated with pom poms on their guard-sticks, as well as the older style rigid fan, usually decorated with feathers and jewels. Meanwhile, these rigid style fans often hung from the skirts of ladies, but of the fans of this era it is only the more exotic folding ones which have survived. In fact, folding fans of this era demonstrated the high status. Besides, exotic items on par with elaborate gloves were perfect gifts to royalty.
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