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Category Archive: History

History through LIFE magazine covers

History through LIFE magazine covers

History through LIFE magazine covers

History through LIFE magazine covers
When the first issue of Life magazine appeared on the newsstands, the U.S. was in the midst of the Great Depression and the world was headed toward war. Each week during World War II the magazine brought the war home to Americans; it had photographers in all theaters of war, from the Pacific to Europe. The magazine was so iconic that it was imitated in enemy propaganda using contrasting images of Life and Death. In the 1960s the magazine was filled with color photos of movie stars, President John F. Kennedy and his family, the war in Vietnam, and the Apollo program. Typical of the magazine’s editorial focus was a long 1964 feature on actress Elizabeth Taylor and her relationship to actor Richard Burton. Reporter Richard Meryman Jr. traveled with Taylor to New York, California, and Paris. Life ran a 6,000-word first-person article on the screen star.
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Papua New Guinea and Miklhouho-Maclay

Papua New Guinea and Miklhouho-Maclay

Tribal people of Papua New Guinea and Miklhouho-Maclay

Papua New Guinea and Miklhouho-Maclay
One of the most culturally diverse countries in the world, Papua New Guinea has more than 850 indigenous languages. In addition, at least as many traditional societies, out of a population of just under seven million. Also, one of the most rural, as only 18% of its people live in urban centers. The country is one of the world’s least explored, culturally and geographically. Besides, many undiscovered species of plants and animals are thought to exist in the interior of Papua New Guinea. Exploration of the island, and the penetration of Europeans began only in the XIX century. Thus, the Russian researcher Nicholas Miklhouho-Maclay lived among the Papuans, a total of almost four years (in the 1870s and early 1880s).
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One person town Monowi

One person town Monowi

A photo of 1908. One person town Monowi

One person town Monowi
There are towns with population of 1 person, and while there’s at least 1 person living in it, it is not abandoned. Noteworthy, Monowi, Nebraska has a population of one person. And the only resident of this town – Elsie Eiler, 77 years old. Most of the town’s buildings are crumbling down, and as you can imagine, it’s very quiet and desolate place. In fact, the last event was the funeral of Elsie’s father, at the town church, fifty years ago.
Meanwhile, Elsie works at the tavern where she serves the coldest beer in town. Of course, she is the only employee and it’s the only beer in town. She serves the people passing through who decide to stop.
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Thanksgiving and the pilgrims

Thanksgiving and the pilgrims

The First Thanksgiving, reproduction of an oil painting by J.L.G. Ferris, early 20th century

Thanksgiving and the pilgrims
“Celebrated at the expense of Native Peoples who had to give up their lands and culture for America to become what it is today.” Linda Coombs, Aquinnah Wampanoag, 1997. The Pilgrims did not call this harvest festival a “Thanksgiving,” although they did give thanks to God. To them, a Day of Thanksgiving was purely religious. The first recorded religious Day of Thanksgiving took place in 1623 in response to a providential rainfall.
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Russian traveler Nikolai Miklouho-Maclay

Russian traveler Nikolai Miklouho-Maclay artist Konstantin Makovsky

Artist Konstantin Makovsky. Portrait of Russian traveler Nikolai Miklouho-Maclay (1846-1888)

Russian traveler Nikolai Miklouho-Maclay – an outstanding scientist and humanist, anthropologist and zoologist, widely known in Russia and abroad. In 1871 Miklouho-Maclay went to New Guinea, where he spent 15 months. The people of New Guinea remember the first European who stepped on their land and lived among them as their devoted friend. The bay where he lived has been named “Maclay Coast”. Stamps have been printed in his honor and there are many legends about him among the Papuans. Nikolai Miklouho-Maclay won the trust and admiration of the local people in New Guinea. And, in spite of the fact that he caught malaria in New Guinea and was very ill, he wrote, “…in no other corner of the globe where I have had to live during my wanderings, have I ever felt such an affection as to the coast of New Guinea.”
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Alderney Tapestry Project

Alderney Tapestry Project

Members of the Alderney Tapestry Project started the project a year ago and have just finished. The tapestry is 70m long and woven to tell the tale of the final days of King Harold’s final encounter with William the Conqueror in battle. Alderney Tapestry Project

Alderney Tapestry Project
According to the craftsmen of the beautiful Tapestry Project, it took them a year to create it. The tapestry, in particular, is 70m long and woven to tell the tale of the final days of King Harold’s encounter with William the Conqueror in battle. However, until now that tale did not include the coronation of William, which happened on Christmas Day 1066. According to historians, the final segment of the Bayeux Tapestry was lost, that’s why the islanders began the project to restore it. Meanwhile, Kate Russell, Alderney librarian, along with 416 Alderney residents worked on the project.
According to the craftsmen, they began the original tapestry from the Battle of Hastings. Discovered in the early 18th Century, it ended with the death of King Harold at Hastings. Commissioned by William the Conqueror’s half-brother Bishop Odo, the Bayeux Tapestry aimed to celebrate his victory over Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.
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Gaddafi’s bodyguards

Gaddafi's bodyguards

Wearing red berets, so-called “revolutionary nuns”, Gaddafi’s bodyguards

Gaddafi’s bodyguards
Often called Amazon Guard, they were female elite bodyguards of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. Meanwhile, their official name was “revolutionary nuns”, or “green nuns”. The detachment consisted entirely of women who had received special military training. The division formed in the early 1980s, a few years after his resignation from the post of Gaddafi Libyan state and acceptance of of another title. In particular, the leader of the revolution together with the declaration of Libya’s Jamahiriya. However, the reasons for creating such a unit is unclear. According to the most common version, Gaddafi allegedly suggested that Arab terrorists, the victim of which he could be, will not be able to shoot at women. And another version, though more prosaic – female bodyguard was just one of the bizarre ways to attract the attention of the world.
Traditionally, 15 “Amazons” accompanied Gaddafi during his visits through the country and abroad. Noteworthy, in 1998 one of his bodyguards had saved his life at the cost of her own.
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