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Perseid meteor shower

Perseid meteor shower

Beautiful image of night sky showing Perseid meteor shower

Perseid meteor shower
People from different parts of the northern hemisphere of our planet spent the past few days looking up into the night sky to catch one of the most spectacular celestial light shows. Space enthusiasts admired dazzling Perseid meteor shower. The meteor shower is called Perseid because the point from which they appear to radiate lies in the constellation Perseus, named after one of the greatest heroes of the Greek mythology.

Silver Springs, Nevada

Silver Springs, Nevada

In this photo provided by Kevin Clifford, a meteor from the annual Perseid meteor shower falls from space over ruins at Fort Churchill State Historic Park on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012, in Silver Springs, Nev. The Perseid meteors are debris left from the comet Swift-Tuttle. Fort Churchill, built in 1861 by the United States army to protect early settlers. (AP Photo/Kevin Clifford)

In fact, Perseid appears every year in August from the Perseus constellation. Formed as a result of the Earth passing through the trail of dust particles released by the comet Swift-Tuttle. Tiny particles, the size of a grain of sand, burn up in Earth’s atmosphere, forming a star rain. First it “showers” with the greatest force, then gradually weakens. The flow is active from July 17 to August 24, and the maximum is usually on August 12. The quantity of meteors usually reaches 60 per hour.

Perseid meteor shower

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