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Fabulous view of Toyama Bay luminous jellyfish

Toyama Bay luminous jellyfish

Beautiful view of thousands of glowing in the dark jellyfish. Toyama Bay luminous jellyfish

Toyama Bay luminous jellyfish
In fact, such an incredible view is due to the thousands of jellyfish glowing in the darkness. And due to the surf on the shore of Japan that threw luminous jellyfish. Usually found in deep water, they rise to the upper layers of the ocean during the breeding. That’s where they are easy to be washed ashore. Meanwhile, scientists in Yorkshire have developed a process that uses the luminous cells from jellyfish to diagnose cancers deep within the human body. The method has been developed at the Yorkshire Cancer Research Laboratory at The University of York. According to the man who leads the York team, Professor Norman Maitland, it will revolutionize the way of diagnosing cancers.

Thousands of luminous jellyfish at the Toyama Bay Japan

Thousands of luminous jellyfish at the Toyama Bay Japan

Besides, in one of his interviews he explained: “Cancers deep within the body are difficult to spot at an early stage, and early diagnosis is critical for the successful treatment of any form of cancer. What we have developed is a process which involves inserting proteins derived from luminous jellyfish cells into human cancer cells. Then, when we illuminate the tissue, a special camera detects these proteins as they light up, indicating where the tumors are.”

The process is an extension of the work done by American chemist Dr. Roger Y. Tsien, who won a Nobel Prize in 2008 for taking luminous cells from a common jellyfish called the crystal jelly and isolating the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The GFP is the substance that allows jellyfish to glow in the dark.

Toyama Bay luminous jellyfish

sources
sciencedaily.com
trasyy.livejournal.com