Beauty will save

Beauty in everything

Moeraki Boulders came to us from another planet

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

Moeraki Boulders came to us from another planet. This is an amazing natural phenomenon, so-called Moeraki boulders, also known as “Elijah’s watermelon.” Someone thinks they are dinosaur eggs, some – fruits of ancient marine plants, and some even suggest the possibility that this is the remains of an UFO. The Moeraki Boulders are unusually large and spherical boulders lying along a stretch of Koekohe Beach on the wave cut Otago coast of New Zealand between Moeraki and Hampden.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

The Moeraki Boulders, Koekohe Beach, Otago coast of New Zealand.

Local Maori legends explained the boulders as the remains of eel baskets, calabashes, and kumara washed ashore from the wreck of an Arai-te-uru, a large sailing canoe. This legend tells of the rocky shoals that extend seaward from Shag Point as being the petrified hull of this wreck and a nearby rocky promontory as being the body of the canoe’s captain. In 1848 W.B.D. Mantell sketched the beach and its boulders, more numerous than now. The picture is now in the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington. The boulders were described in 1850 colonial reports and numerous popular articles since that time. In more recent times they have become a popular tourist attraction.

wiki/Moeraki_boulders