Nature

Solar eclipse 2013

Solar eclipse 2013
The morning of May 10, the picture in the light of H-alpha. Solar eclipse 2013

The first annular Solar eclipse 2013 took place on May 10th, 2013, and it was over the Pacific Ocean and Australia. The annular solar eclipse does not look less impressive than full. In full contrast, when the moon completely obscures the solar disk during an annular eclipse at our satellite and passes in front of the disk of the sun, but does not eclipse it completely due to insufficient size. The next total solar eclipse will occur on November 14, 2031.

Solar eclipse 2013
May 10, 2013. Western Australia.

Total solar eclipses actually take place nearly as often as total lunar eclipses; they occur at a rate of about 3 every 4 years, while total lunar eclipses come at a rate of about 5 every 6 years. However, total lunar eclipses are visible over at least half of the Earth, while total solar eclipses can be seen only along a very narrow path up to a few hundred miles wide and a few thousand miles long. Observing a total solar eclipse is thus a rarity for most people. Unlike lunar eclipses, solar eclipses can be dangerous to observe. This is not because the Sun emits more potent rays during a solar eclipse, but because the Sun is always dangerous to observe directly and people are particularly likely to stare at it during a solar eclipse.

Solar eclipse 2013
Annular solar eclipse at sunrise

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partially obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon’s apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun, blocking most of the Sun’s light and causing the Sun to look like a ring. An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region thousands of kilometers wide.

Solar eclipse 2013

Solar eclipse 2013
Another impressive shot annular eclipse of the sun, resulting from the rising
Solar eclipse 2013
Eclipse photographed in the light of H-alpha
Eclipse photographed in the light of H-alpha
Eclipse photographed in the light of H-alpha

Total eclipse of the band is very narrow. Outside the Moon only partially obscures the Sun, such an eclipse is called private. Australian Mike Salway lives near Sydney. Here moon eclipsed only 40% of the solar disk. For this picture the author had to use special filters.

Queensland, Australia
Queensland, Australia
Solar eclipse 2013
70 kilometers from Tennant Creek, Australia
In the H-alpha rays of the sun can be seen a lot of detail — granulation, prominence, flares
In the H-alpha rays of the sun can be seen a lot of detail — granulation, prominence, flares

http://photos-0.blogspot.ru/

You may also like...